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“At the same time, purified by fasting in the body and in the soul, we prepare to commemorate in a manner more worthy of the sacred Mysteries of our Redemption through remembrance of the Passion and the Resurrection, which are celebrated with the greatest solemnity, especially in the Lenten season.

The observance of Lent is the bond of union in our army; by it we are distinguished from the enemies of the Cross of Christ; by it we turn aside the chastisements of God’s wrath; by its means, being guarded by heavenly support during the day, we fortify ourselves against the prince of darkness. If this observance comes to be relaxed, it is to the detriment of God’s glory, to the dishonor of the Catholic religion and to the peril of souls, nor can it be doubted that such negligence will become a source of misfortune to nations, of disaster in public affairs and of adversity to individuals.” – Pope Benedict XIV, Non ambigimus May 30, 1741

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Host of the show: One of these three contestants is a true Catholic. He is a true follower of the Catholic Church.  The four panelists must ask the three contestants questions and with the audience correctly vote which one is telling the truth.

Panelist a): Must you always obey the pope?

Contestant #1: Only when he teaches ex cathedra, meaning when he defines a doctrine on faith and morals as the pope for the whole Church to believe as dogma of the Catholic faith.

Contestant #2: We must always obey him unless he goes against the faith, then we are not bound to obey him.

Contestant #3: We must obey the pope in all of his official acts, which include ex cathedra teachings, laws, and his ordinary magisterial teachings. Popes do not err against the faith. They can and have erred in an opinion the Church has not yet settled but we are not bound by those opinions.

Panelist b): What happens if the pope should err against the faith?

Contestant #3: He would by that very fact cease to be pope. However, as Catholics we may hold that Christ would not permit such a thing since He prayed that Peter’s faith will not fail.

Contestant #2: Christ’s prayer only refers to dogmatic definitions. Therefore, when a pope errs against the faith, Catholics may resist him.

Contestant #1: Historically, popes have erred against the faith but remained popes. Only a council of bishops or future pope can judge the erroneous pope.

Panelist c): A pope can be judged?

Contestant #1: Only when he departs from the faith.

Contestant #2: He can only be judged in the sense that we don’t have to believe and follow his errors.

Contestant #3: It’s a dogma that a true pope can’t defect from the faith and remain pope. Therefore, he need not be judged.

Panelist d): What about the dogma on unity of faith?

Contestant #2: We are unified in the essentials of the Catholic faith. That’s all that’s necessary to fulfill the requirement of the dogma. Unity of faith is just recognizing Francis as pope and going to a Catholic Church in union with him.

Contestant #3: A pope who rejects a dogma is not unified in faith. Therefore, the unity is only with actual members of the Church as opposed to fake members of the Church. Catholics are unified in all teachings of the Church.

Contestant #1: The unity or oneness is only with the Catholic faith. The Faith is one. It doesn’t include other faiths.

Panelist a): If the pope openly professes heresy, how can the Church with the unity of faith actually have unity of faith when the heretical pope who is its head is not actually in unity with the Catholic faith and faithful?

Contestant #2: The unity is not in the profession of faith but recognizing Francis as pope.

Contestant #1: The pope is only in unity of the Church as its head but not necessarily in the faith that’s professed.

Contestant #3: It can’t be. That’s why the pope who is the head of the Church must profess the Faith entirely in order to actually be one in faith with the faithful.

Panelist b): What about Pope Francis’ teaching that “The pluralism and the diversity of religions, color, sex, race and language are willed by God in His wisdom, through which He created human beings” is now an official act of the Church by being placed in the Acta Apostolicae Sedis CXI, n. 3 (March 2019), pp. 349-356?

Contestant #3: This proves that Francis can’t be the true pope. If he were the true pope, the Church would officially be heretical and no different from Protestant and Eastern Orthodox religions in that respect.

Contestant #2: The Acta Apostolicae Sedis doesn’t represent the Catholic faith. Only ex cathedra and universal and ordinary teachings make up the Catholic faith.

Contestant #1: When a Church teaching only requires religious assent and not the assent of faith, it’s not guaranteed to be free from error. Vatican 2, for instance, doesn’t require the assent of faith. Therefore, the Church can have errors such as this one in the Acta Apostolicae Sedis.

Panel c): If official Church teachings can be heretical, how is the Catholic Church not hypocritical for condemning other religions for being heretical?

Contestant 1: Because the Church is only guaranteed to teach truth when it’s teaching infallibly, Ex cathedra definitions and universal and ordinary teachings make-up of the faith. All other Church teachings can be resisted and rejected.

Contestant 2: I have nothing to add to #1 except that hypocrisy is found everywhere.

Contestant 3: This is precisely why the Church can never promulgate heresy in any form. Every official papal teaching must be safe and sound. Protestant religions never claim infallibility when they teach doctrine, but the Catholic Church still condemns them as heretical religions. Infallibility has nothing to do with it. It can never be heretical without being the biggest hypocritical religion in the world. 

Panelist d): Why the need for infallibility if the Church can’t teach heresy anyway?

Contestant 3: Heresy is a teaching contrary to the faith that’s been defined under the charism of infallibility. Doctrinal opinions are not at all part of the Faith. The pope and Church can err and has erred in opinions not yet defined or settled as part of the faith. Infallibility simply secures the indefectibility of the Church.

Contestant 2: The Church can teach heresy when not using infallibility.

Contestant 1: I agree with #2.

Host of the show: Okay panelists, mark your ballots. While you vote, it’s time for the studio audience to vote.

Panelist a): I’m not Catholic but I voted for #3. His position was the only one that’s consistent with the Catholic Church as I heard it from my grandfather.

Panelist b): I couldn’t tell the difference between #1 and #2, so I voted for #3.

Panelist c): Catholics can’t be so naïve as to believe the pope can never err against the Church, so it couldn’t be #3. I like how simple #2 answered. I voted for #2.

Panelist d): #3 doesn’t believe Pope Francis is the pope and the whole world knows he’s the pope. I like how #1 answered my question about unity of faith. #1 was more reasonable than #2 and he explained what ex cathedra meant at the beginning, so I voted for #1.

Host of the show: The audience vote is in and it’s 49 votes for #1, 41 votes for #2, and only 10 for #3.

Host of the show: Will the real Catholic please stand up?

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Lately, I’ve been trying to hit all the different angles of the pseudo-traditionalist errors.

One particular pseudo-traditionalist here in Kentucky that I’ve been emailing, can’t see the forest for the trees. He misunderstands the differences between material and formal heresy, internal and external forum, the application of laws, dogmas and opinions, etc. Rather than getting bogged down in explaining the differences, I’ve decided to get it down to one main point.

One thing that’s undeniable is the fact that there are four marks, which are four dogmas that identify the true religion.

Many of these fake Catholics acknowledge that Vatican 2 and the Vatican 2 popes have promulgated heretical teachings. The pseudo-trad from Ky is no exception.

As soon as the pseudo-traditionalist points to this or that heresy of his religion, the question comes down to how his religion still has those four marks and how he still holds to them himself. Claiming the Church teaches heresy by law or decree leads to an avalanche of heresy against the four marks of the Church.

Oneness in Catholic faith can’t exist in the external forum if the magisterium is promulgating heresy. The Church will be divided between those who accept and reject the heresy. The Church would be no different from the Protestant and Eastern Orthodox religions in principle.

Holiness would be missing since heresy is unholy. The true Church can’t have unholy doctrines or else it would be no different from the Protestant and Eastern Orthodox religions.

Catholicity would be missing since heresy is damning.  The Roman Catechism declared the Catholic Church to be “universal, because all who desire eternal salvation must cling to and embrace her, like those who entered the ark to escape perishing in the flood. This (note of catholicity), therefore, is to be taught as a most reliable criterion, by which to distinguish the true from a false Church.” Heresy severs from Catholicism, which severs from salvation.

Apostolicity would be missing since heresy is not Apostolic. Protestant and Eastern Orthodox religions have false teachings, which prove they are not apostolic.

Pseudo-traditionalists like to attack sedevacantism for not having bishops with the fullness of apostolic succession. They fail to see that apostolicity requires the fullness of apostolic teaching. The Roman Catechism notes on the Apostolic mark, The true Church is also to be recognised from her origin, which can be traced back under the law of grace to the Apostles; for her doctrine is the truth not recently given, nor now first heard of, but delivered of old by the Apostles, and disseminated throughout the entire world. Hence no one can doubt that the impious opinions which heresy invents, opposed as they are to the doctrines taught by the Church from the days of the Apostles to the present time, are very different from the faith of the true Church.”

So when the fake Catholic acknowledges heresy from its councils, laws and other decrees, it necessarily follows that he denies the four dogmatic marks of his own religion. He becomes his own worst enemy.

Six years ago, I posted: Missing the Marks: The Church of Vatican 2.  If one knows that his religion denies the four marks, then again, it necessarily follows that he will, too.

There is no escape for the pseudo-traditionalist. He’s trapped in a false religion with an avalanche of his own heresies.   

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On August 17, 2021, the employees at the Catholic Center of the Diocese of Lexington were instructed by Bishop John Stowe to be vaccinated by Sept. 1 as a condition for employment. He announced that he’ll support his priests who implement the same policy. Stowe also requires masks to be worn as a condition of employment.

Stowe explained: “This is an urgent matter of public health and safety. There is no religious exemption for Catholics to being vaccinated, and Pope Francis has repeatedly called this a moral obligation. The health care system is now overwhelmed by a crisis caused primarily by those who refuse to protect themselves and others by getting vaccinated. This is unacceptable, and our diocese now joins those employers who have already made this basic commitment to the common good a requirement.”[1]

The implications of Bishop Stowe’s statement are:

  •  It’s morally obligatory to get vaccinated because the unvaccinated are the primary cause of the crisis.
  •  It’s immoral to refuse to be vaccinated.

Why would the rest of diocese be exempt from the requirement of getting vaccinated if the morality and the end of the crisis depend on getting vaccinated?

Perhaps Stowe can make a mandate by threatening a few jobs, which can be easily filled by others, but he can’t mandate the whole diocese without the threat of losing half the members of the diocese, thus losing half of the diocesan income. Therefore, you won’t see a diocesan wide vaccine mandate.

The bottom line here is morality and public health take a backseat to money with Bishop Stowe, who just proved it with his hypocritical mandate.

All that’s needed to stop the bishop’s tyranny is for enough members to stop giving money to their diocese.

As for claiming religious exemption, not only do Catholics have a right, but a duty to stand in their religious convictions against so-called vaccines known to be very dangerous. [2] There are other options, which are a much safer and more effective means against the sickness. Stowe is contradicting his own religion on religious liberty against his own flock. 

Bishop Stowe’s tyrannical mandate is not about morality and public health. It’s about control. Stowe is just another authoritarian on a mission to usher in antichrist against God-fearing people who love freedom.

The so-called crisis depends on the flow of money, which is the god of this world.  

Footnotes:

[1] Diocese Mandates COVID-19 Vaccination for Catholic Center Employees – cdlex

[2] See How to save the world, in three easy steps – YouTube

Dr. David Martin w/ Stew Peters: There Is No Virus. This Is Organized Crime. – Truth Comes to Light

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We are in my favorite month of the year. In June, the days are the longest, work is plentiful, the first batch of honey is ready to be harvested, and the delicious tart cherries, blueberries, strawberries, mulberries, etc are ready to be picked and eaten. Most importantly, this is the month of the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus.

In honor of Our Lord and the Catholic Church, I designed a banner and made bumper stickers out of it. They come in two sizes. Small ones are roughly 3.5 by 7 inches and the large ones are 7 by 14 inches. The actual stickers are much brighter and cleaner than pictures shown below.

If you are interested in having one for your car or truck, you may email me at catholicwarrior@juno.com for pricing, which will vary depending where you live.

 

 

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Growing up in Kentucky, we spent most of our time outdoors. When we got hungry, we just grabbed an apple off our apple tree that we grew in our field. We also had several tart cherry trees, peach trees, and pear trees, but perhaps the neatest thing we had were beehives. My father is a beekeeper and every year we get to eat delicious clover honey. What an awesome treat! Little did I know just how important the honeybee truly is for our lives and our holy Catholic Faith.

The honeybee may be the most important animal on earth. Pollination is vitally important for life on earth and the bees are the number one pollinators. Honey is a superfood. Bacteria can’t live in it. It’s used for ailments such as the common cold. It will help clean your teeth by killing the bacteria buildup. Bee venom is also used for healing. The honeybee is truly a gift from God.

In the early Church, the honeybee was considered a sacred creature and is a uniquely Catholic symbol.

The bee is found six times in the Bible: Deut. 1:44, Judges 14:8, Psalm 117:12, Sirach 11:3, Isaiah 7:18, and it’s also found in an addition to the Septuagint version of Proverbs of chapter 6, “Go to the ant, O sluggard, and consider her ways, and learn wisdom …. Or go to the bee, and learn how industrious she is, and how her industry deserves our respect, for kings and the sick make use of the product of her labor for their health. Indeed, she is glorious and desired by all, and though she be frail, she is honored, because she treasures wisdom.” Deborah is also the Hebrew word for bee.

Honey is mentioned 61 times in the Old Testament and 5 times in the New Testament and honeycomb is mentioned 11 times in the Bible. Samson and John the Baptist ate honey.

Christians have looked to the honeybee as a model for the Christian life. They symbolize hard work, chastity, and sacrifice. St. John Chrysostom wrote in his 12th Homily, “The bee is more honored than other animals, not because it labors, but because it labors for others.” 

The traditional tabernacle and the triple tiara are shaped like a beehive and the altar candles are made from 100% beeswax, which is a symbol of purity. Honey represents sweetness, which the Word of God in Scripture, Tradition, and the Eucharist certainly is.

Honeybees also stay with the Queen. They guard, protect, and follow her. Wherever she goes, they go. When bees sting an intruder in their hive, they will ultimately die. In other words, they will give up their own lives to save the others, especially the queen. Let us stay with Our Lady and guard and protect her honor and follow her as she followed Our Lord.

The patron saint of beekeepers and candle-makers is St. Ambrose. Legend has it that when he was an infant in his cradle, bees swarmed his mouth leaving no sting but only honey. It came to pass that he would be called the “Honey Tongued Doctor.” The beekeeper term Ambrosia (from the name of the saint) is a mixture of pollen and nectar used to feed bee larvae by worker bees.

Cardinal Maffeo Barberini changed his coat of arms from 3 horseflies to 3 honeybees to gain status. He would later became Pope Urban VIII in 1623 and he spread the imagery of honeybees throughout Rome. You can see his bees in the huge columns of the Altar of the Confession in St. Peter’s Basilica.   

Monument to Pope Urban VIII-St Peter’s Basilica – Walks in Rome (Est. 2001)

Pope Pius XI tells us that the Christian teacher imitates the bee “which takes the choicest part of the flower and leaves the rest” (Divini illius Magistri, n. 87).

Lastly, Pope Pius XII gave an address on honeybees on Nov. 27, 1948. He declared, “Bees are models of social life and activity, in which each class has its duty to perform and performs it exactly…Ah, if men could and would listen to the lesson of the bees…how much better the world would be! Working like bees with order and peace, men would learn to enjoy and have others enjoy the fruit of their labors…” [See footnote for full papal address. ]

The next time you see a honeybee, be reminded of the words of our popes and let it be. It has a lot of important work to do and so do we.

 

 

Footnote

On Bees | EWTN

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“When one loves the pope, one does not stop to debate about what he advises or demands, to ask how far the rigorous duty of obedience extends and to mark the limit to this obligation. When one loves the pope, one does not object that he has not spoken clearly enough, as if he were obliged to repeat into the ear of each individual his will, so often clearly expressed, not only viva voce, but also by letters and other public documents; one does not call his orders into doubt on the pretext- easily advanced by whoever does not wish to obey-that they emanate not directly from him, but from his entourage; one does not limit the field in which he can and should exercise his will; one does not oppose to the authority of the pope that of other persons, however learned, who differ in opinion from the pope. Besides however great their knowledge, their holiness is wanting, FOR THERE CAN BE NO HOLINESS WHERE THERE IS DISAGREEMENT WITH THE POPE.” Address to the priest of the Apostolic Union, Nov. 18, 1912 In Acta Apostolicae Sedis 4 [1912] p. 695 

Now apply this teaching of Pope St. Pius X to the following… 

Pope names homosexual to Vatican commission (traditioninaction.org)

Francis holds hands with pro-homo priest (traditioninaction.org)

Pro ‘Gay’ Finnish Lutheran bishop received by Francis (traditioninaction.org)

Homosexual couple welcomed at the Vatican (traditioninaction.org)

Homosexual invited to be lector at papal Mass (traditioninaction.org)

Pope Bergoglio Kisses the Hand of a Pro-homosexcual Priest (traditioninaction.org)

Pope Benedict praises homosexual Archbishop Juliusz Paetz; L’Osservatore Romano praises Oscar Wilde (traditioninaction.org)

Benedict XVI blessed by a rabbi in Sao Paulo, Brazil @ TraditionInAction.org

Benedict XVI visiting a mosque in Constantinople @ TraditionInAction.org

Benedict XVI promotes women on the Altar; pictures of a Mass at the St. Peter’s Basilica @ TraditionInAction.org

 

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I recently found a gem in a military documentary. On Christmas, my son gave me a dvd on the Navajo Code Talkers of World War II. It was a perfect gift for one interested in war movies and the different cultures of the world particularly the Native American Indians. For those unaware, the Navajos played a major part in our battle with Japan. Several of these brave men tell their stories in the documentary. However, one of stories stood out to us. Marine Samuel Nakai Tso tells us some of the horror and the grace he experienced in one particular battle:

This is for real. Keep your eyes open all the time and keep your bullets in there, just lock it. While we were doing that, all of a sudden, he said, “Here they come. Here they come.” He starts blasting away, so we just grabbed our rifles. All you could do was just to start shooting, and all the rest of the guys start shooting. As soon as I went over that sandbar, this crater hole there, there’s a guy still leaning down. I though he was still alive with his helmet, and then a blast from that shell took his head off. From then on, the sergeant starts screaming, “Loosen your chinstrap,” so we’ll loosen them up. Those forces out there, it has a lot of force it can push your neck in. So that’s why we loosen our chin straps. If it blows it up, he blows it away, but some guys get saved like that. It did not take long for them to go across. We cut them across so they won’t exchange any water, footd, or ammunition. Marines went that way and we went north on the other side. By that time, from here, the ships were all out there blasting away. On the other side, they had some ships over there on the other side. That’s real deafening. When it explodes over there, you can hear it. You look over to the ship, and that sound goes back to the ship…

I didn’t know we were going to hit Iwo Jima at all, but somewhere on February the 16th or 17th, we were coming in early in the morning. We saw the mountain right there looming up. It was this little island, we just overrun that thing with all these ships coming in. We just run over that little island and go on home. But we land there and we fought, and it anybody says, many people ask me if I was scared. I say, “Yeah, I was scared.” I don’t want to tell no lies or anything. I was scared, I say. But one thing for sure, one night I dreamed a young Indian maiden came to me and gave me something. She says you wear this, you’ll come to us. I dreamed about it. One of my buddies in the foxhole kicked me and woke me up. They asked me if I had a nightmare. I woke up and that dream was so clear in my mind. I just sat there. Everybody went to breakfast. Came back, I was still sitting there thinking about it. All of a sudden, they said mail call. I don’t get no mail from anybody. I didn’t know anybody. My parents, my sisters and brothers, they are uneducated. They couldn’t write to me. So I don’t go to mail call. All of a sudden, one guy comes running back and says, “Hey, Chief, you got a letter. You got a letter.” We tore open that letter, and there was an Indian made sort of like, a rosary from a Catholic Church made out of cedar beads with a cedar cross on it, and then I just looked at it. Who would write to me? No address on it. Then “Oh, yeah, I’m supposed to wear this.” So I reached over and put it over my neck. Just the moment I put that thing on my neck, all fear disappeared, and I keep saying, “I’m going home. I’m going home.” Up to this day, I have not found who ever sent me that rosary. Nothing. So if you believe in your dreams, I quit believing, but that helped me. When I say that it helped me, I went to the rest of the time without any fear even when we ran across death valley.

I was so intrigued over his story, that after the film, I looked up Sam Tso to find out more about him. I immediately discovered more interview clips from him here: >https://www.c-span.org/video/?459728-1/navajo-code-talker-samuel-tso-oral-history-interview

The Navajo Times had a nice write up about him 8 days after Mr. Tso’s death on May 9, 2012 with pictures of his funeral. It appeared that Samuel Nakai Tso had a funeral mass at St. Isabel Mission Catholic Church for Navajo Indians, in Chinle, Arizona and buried with full military honors at Veteran’s Navajo Cemetary.

50% of all US Marines of World War II were Catholic. Let us never forget the sacrifice of these brave American heroes and the Navajo warriors like Samuel Tso who said, “I found out my land and my people. I found out my land was the whole United States, my people were all citizens of the United States. That was my people.”

In these dark days of America and the world, let us also pray for our country and the Church and not let the sacrifice of these men be in vain. And pray most fervantly for those souls in Purgatory.

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Some of my favorite Christmas music…

(2) Lovely Far Off City – YouTube

(2) The Holly Tree – YouTube

(2) Christmas In Carrick – YouTube

(2) Celtic Thunder – ‘Christmas 1915’ – YouTube

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